Tito Jackson’s Thanksgiving Turkey Giveaway


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Proud City Councillor Tito Jackson will be hosting his 4th Annual Turkey Giveaway at his district, Roxbury Crossing, in Massachusetts.

Each year benefactors, from all over Boston, provide Mr. Tito Jackson with thousands of turkeys. And each year Mr. Tito Jackson takes one day aside from his civic duties to giveaway turkeys to families less fortunate in his low income area of District 7–one turkey per family.

The mission of the Tito Jackson Community Fund is to give back to those in need, and to provide a meal that has been celebrated in our great nation for over a century.

Mr. Tito Jackson is looking for volunteers and if you are interested he asks that you RSVP with his overseer Monica Cannon via phone 857-269-9340 or email (titojacksoncommunityfund@gmail.com).

You can also RSVP via Facebook to attend the event at https://www.facebook.com/events/843812225651539/

Ladarrel Hagans

A special volunteer who will be helping in this effort is LaDarrel Hagans, Singer and Well-Renowned Community Organizer. Read his story and learn how he became the outstanding grassroots organizer that he is today.

LaDarrel Hagans: His Story and How He Organized His Community for Change

Weekly Political Report: Prince Sefa-Boakye’s Reaction to the 2014 Midterms


Each week I write a political editorial that affects you and the world around you.

This week’s political editorial: My Reaction to 2014 Midterm Election.

Republicans winNovember 4th, was surely a night to remember. What America thought was impossible became the possible, with Republicans sweeping the Senate election race and the governor race across the nation especially here in Massachusetts–Not to mention that pot is now legal in Washington, D.C. And the politics that really dominated the air waves of this race was, of course President’s Obama presidency.

It seems as though you don’t need to have any government experience to run for office. As long as you have enough TV attack ads to criticize the president and attach any of his progressive policies to a candidate, that you can win election! And more importantly you can suppress a significant portion of citizens from not voting at all, which I think happened in this Midterm election. And so my reaction to this Midterm election was shocking and disappointing–disappointing in regards to Martha Coakley and Celeste Ribeiro Myers’ lost in the Massachusetts Gubernational race.

In June of 2014, after the Supreme Court upheld to lift the cap on Political Spending, I made a prediction on Twitter (and a radio talk on UR Business Network: Money and Politics inside the Supreme Courthouse of The United States), that “midterms elections will be ugly” and sure enough I was right. But the biggest thing you should take away from this election is the geography.

If you take a look at the map above, you will see the geography of how the election was fought–the distinct colors of state, corresponding to their political parties. A lot of people may not know is that most of the contested states were, for the most part, Republican states–and if not were surrounded by Republican states. And so it was very hard for any Democrat to have strong hold over a state, when it was a Republican state to begin with. But the key states that were fought for the soul of the Senate (just to name a few) were North Carolina, Virginia, Iowa, and New Hampshire. These were considered “up for grabs” states since they switch their allegiance from one party to another on each election. And as you can see from the map Republicans were not only successful in their geography but their unlimited resources (due in part of the Supreme Court’s decision to lift the cap on Political Spending)–to attack the name “Obama” and attach it to his supporters via air waves. This is in a sense of how politics in this country works. Rather than talk about ideas of progress or mobolizing people to exercise their civic duty to vote, it was more about “mud-slinging” and collecting votes, especially if you have friends at the Supreme Court level who can bend the rules on fair play: Striking down a Key Provision of Voting Rights Act of 1965 and Political Spending).

In all honesty, politics is about helping people and marshaling positive ideas to move people forward especially to the polls. Today it’s about slinging mud to an oppressor, when there is no oppression to begin with or collecting votes. In this case, it seems to me that Republicans only want to repeal Obamacare for their own benefit and not the benefit of the whole country, which has cost America a government shutdown. Now with this seized golden opportunity, Republicans (in both houses) can now bend the will of the president, and have him serve their needs, without thinking twice to those who don’t share their ideals or financial means to get by in life. Rand Paul admittedly said that the GOP has done a terrible job of reaching out to the minority community, so what makes you think that this election will be any different? Maybe now, with their newly claimed territory in the Senate House, will Republicans reach out to the minority community and engage in their issues.

So here are my predictions from here to 2016:

  • President Obama’s legacy in the White House will be more to difficult to create and restore after the huge fallout of congressional seats in both houses.
  • More gridlock than bipartisanship in DC because of prior failed attempts to agree on any issue. There will never be a bi-partisan up-down vote on any proposal, except for Immigration, but only if, Republicans will be willing to consider serious reforms and object bias opinions. Moreover, there will be more “blocks” and “vetoes” until someone blinks. But “executive orders” from the President will be a defining moment in his Presidential legacy
  • The Hilary Clinton campaign will need to have a serious assessment of how to enter the Presidential race, even if they consider a bid for President in 2016.
  • Possible repeal in ObamaCare, and a possible implementation of Keystone Oil pipeline
  • Possible cuts in Education and other programs (Medicare, Unemployment insurance, etc) that many Americans still see as a valuable.

Personal Note: On a personal note I want to send my best wishes to Celeste Ribeiro Myers and Martha Coakley for a hard fought campaign–and I am deeply saddened by your loss. I am a big fan of you and your principles of fairness and equal opportunity for everyone–the same principles that have led me here two years ago, to campaign for Elizabeth Warren on the Massachusetts Democratic Party campaign. I know this is a huge set back for Massachusetts but these same principles still exists in the hearts of many, which have made Boston and the Commonwealth great.

Prince’s Briefcase: How Not To Pay Off Your Student Loans (Johnson v. Otterbein University)


Here is a case which a handwritten letter, promising to pay off your student loans, is not a legal consideration to enforce a promise

prince's breifcaseThis case comes from my Contracts class where we are studying the “Doctrine of Consideration.” Below is my case brief which thousands of law students use to help us understand the cases and root out the “issue.”

Case Name, Author, Citation
Johnson v. Otterbein University, Supreme Court of Ohio, 41 Ohio 527 (1885)


Procedural Posture

The defendant (Otterbein University) sues the appellant or plaintiff (Johnson) for failure to fulfill his promise stated in a note sent by the plaintiff. The note was a student repayment loan, and that the defendant alleged that it was without consideration and was denied in the reply. The court entered judgment in favor of the defendant and a motion for a new trial was overruled. The Plaintiff then preceded to appeal in efforts to reverse judgment of the trial court.

Facts.
The case is about the validity of the note, sent by Johnson to Otterbein University in what appears to be a Student Repayment Loan, and whether it should be a valid consideration to enforce his promise:

“$100
Westerville, Ohio, May 6, 1869
Three years after the date, I promise to pay to the trustees of Otterbein University of Ohio, or their agents, one hundred dollars, with interest, at the rate of no per cent., to be used exclusively to liquidate the present, that is, February (1869) indebtedness of said University. Should this donation ever be used for any other purpose than herein specified, the trustees of said University shall be held bound to refund said sum of money to the donor.
–John Johnson”

This note was signed and delivered to Spangler, an agent of Otterbein University, along with similar notes promising to pay $100 to the University in 3 years to help pay off the current University debt. These notes and others were accepted as a fund with which to liquidate his debt. The trustees of Otterbein (the defendant) then sued Johnson in December 1875 claiming that his 1869 note was not paid.

Issue
Prince: Does Johnson’s promise (in the form of a note(s)), that brings benefit to him or detriment to Otterbein University, constitute as a legal consideration?
Legal interpretation: Whether a valid consideration was given in a promise to pay money as a gift?

Holding
No; The court says that the creation of the fund (from the notes he sent) with which to pay the university’s indebtedness was not a consideration for the promise.

Reasoning
*Court: An executory contract “to give” is without consideration, and a promise to pay money as a gift may be revoked at any time before payment
Court: The trustees’ acceptance of the writing containing the direction to apply the fund did not give rise to a case of mutual promise (Prince: a mutual promise which both parties agreed to at the same time.

Prince’s Reasoning
A simple IOU note, or sticky notes, in the form of a letter saying “I promise to pay back my loan” in a fixed time frame is not a legal consideration to enforce a promise from the person who is making the promise (promissor)
**FOLLOW UP FROM CLASS: The fact is Johnson will be paying off his student loan debt regardless of any intervening factors. So his notes don’t count for anything. There is no benefit for Johnson or detriment to Otterbein. And Otterbein did not give a promise in an exchange for Johnson’s Promise. This is not a Bargain; more of a gratuitous promise

Rule
Court: A note to repay a student loan should be in the form of a promissory note. And any other forms should have an implicit duty to apply its proceeds to proper corporate objects that would rise upon acceptance. A promissory note is a valid consideration

Disposition
Judgment of Trial Court is reversed favoring the Plaintiff (instead of the Defendant)

Prince’s Takeaways

  • Know what is a legal consideration to enforce a promise
  • Don’t write a letter to your university promising to pay off your student debt in a fixed time frame. Under this case, a Promissory Note is more acceptable than a letter promising to repay your student loans. This is paying money as gift which is not a legal consideration
  • In Contracts, you will learn that reasonable people are not entirely reasonable in their words or actions when they strike deal–so we have rules to remedy “contract breaches” such as this one
  • This case was back in 1885, and a lot has changed. So don’t take it true to fact
  • Usually its the plaintiff (Johnson) that sues the defendant first. But since this decision came from the Supreme Court of Ohio, I guess the parties may have switched roles when they litigated up the state court system (In this case there is no mention that Johnson sued Otterbein first, just that he appealed)
  • $100 dollars is pretty reasonable for a student today to pay off his/her student loans!

To learn how to work from and make money online go to www.livelikeanentrepreneur.com

ThrowBack Thursday: The Day I Voted for Ed Markey


Every Thursday I post a miscellaneous blog/picture/article that I have featured in the past or an interview of an extraordinary individual.

This week’s ThrowBack Thursday: The Day I Voted for Ed Markey

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Today marks the one year anniversary of when I voted for Ed Markey to be the next United States Senator for the state of Massachusetts.

I voted for Ed Markey not just because of his strong commitment towards middle class families, but his strong stance against gun violence–an issue that was (and still is) very important and relevant in our society!

Thank you Senator Ed Markey for representing middle class families and continue to fight to end gun violence in the streets of Massachusetts and across America!

To visit this post, click on the link below.

Today I Voted!

Paying my Dues!

To learn more about Ed Markey and his recent legislations in Congress go to www.edmarkey.com

You can also follow him on Twitter @edmarkey

 

 

Daily Newsfeed


Obama makes a reluctant speech on race and Trayvon Martin; Longtime White House Journalist Helen Thomas dies at the age of 92; Elizabeth Warren is up against the wall on student loan deal; Ari Fleischer blasts Obama for being AWOL on race; 100 ‘Justice For Trayvon’ rallies set; and a woman dies while riding Six Flags roller coaster. All this and more, please follow the links below.

Obama: ‘Trayvon could have been me’

Helen Thomas dies at 92

Elizabeth Warren is up against the wall on student loan deal

Fleischer: Obama AWOL on race

100 Justice For Trayvon rallies set

Woman dies at six flags

Prince In the News


“Prince In the News.” My first online press feature story. Please read, comment, share, like and subscribe!

Prince Sefa-Boakye, a San Diego State University alum, continues to rise.

Sefa-Boakye, ’12, earned his bachelor’s degree from San Diego State University, where he majored in social sciences with an emphasis in political science.

During his collegiate career Prince successfully interned for one of the youngest senators in Congress. He also campaigned for the Massachusetts Democratic Party where they singlehandedly elected the first female senator in Commonwealth history, Sen. Elizabeth Warren.

An Aztec in the Capitol.